Marx computer tips:
This page describes some things I find useful. These are mostly not my ideas, but collected over the years from the net.         The printing system in informatics in Edinburgh (DICE) does allow users on self-managed machines
          such as laptops to print to DICE machines.
However, the username on the system needs to be a valid DICE username.
For windows this means that you have to create a new user. (see DICE pages)
If you use Linux and cups, you can fake the username by replacing in cups/usersys.c
   
    strlcpy(cups_user, pwd->pw_name, sizeof(cups_user));

with
    char *name = "mvanross"; % or rather your DICE username
    strlcpy(cups_user, name, sizeof(cups_user));
    fprintf(stderr, " mvr patch: %s\n", cups_user);
After changing this rebuild cups and define a LPD queue. Of course, this is a quick and dirty solution, but it works.

Open the pdf file with 'gimp' with at least 300dpi. Crop the figures and save.

To be used to run simulations on a (heterogeneous) cluster of machines.
The X11 display settings and the current directory of the local machine are used on the remote machine.
This works best when you NFS your machines.
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#!/usr/bin/perl -w
# Load balancing script for a cluster.
# It runs a command on the machine with the least load.
#
# Usage:
#     dist.perl xclock -digital
# This will run xclock on the fastest machine in your cluster, very useful.
#
# Method: run uptime on all machines to find the current load,
# and use rsh to run it there.
#
# TODO:
# * maybe add option for background process
#
# author: vrossum@brandeis.edu
#
# The hash "machines" contains a paired list of machines
# first entry: their name,
# second entry: their relative speed (in what ever units, but !=0)
# On linux you could use the bogomips in /proc/cpuinfo, times the number of CPUs
#
# THIS YOU WILL HAVE TO EDIT:
%machines= qw(daz2 1 daz3 3 daz6 3.5 daz7 1.2 daz8 1.2 daz10 3.5 daz11 3);

$lazy_machine="";
$min_exctime=1000000;
$command="uptime";

foreach $remote_machine (keys %machines){

  $x = `rsh -n $remote_machine \" uptime \"`;
  @ss= split(/ave/,$x);
  @ss= split(/,*\s+/,$ss[1]);

  $mach_load=$ss[1];
  $speedf = $machines{$remote_machine};
  # print "$remote_machine load $ss[1] speed $speedf\n";
  $exc_time = ($mach_load+1)/$speedf;
  if ($exc_time < $min_exctime) {
    $min_exctime = $exc_time;
    $lazy_machine= $remote_machine;
  };
}
$remote_machine=$lazy_machine;
print "Executing on: $lazy_machine \n";

# ################## RUN the command

$command="";
$pwd= $ENV{"PWD"};
$display =$ENV{"DISPLAY"};
foreach $i (@ARGV){                   # ugly, but it works...
$command=$command." ".$i};

print "$pwd  $command  \n";
#
system "rsh -n $remote_machine \"cd $pwd; setenv DISPLAY $display ; $command \" ";
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